Congressman Kevin Cramer

Representing North Dakota, At Large

CRAMER: EPA Proposes to Approve North Dakota's First-of-its-Kind Application for State Primacy of Class VI Injection Well Activities

May 9, 2017
Press Release

WASHINGTON D.C. – Congressman Kevin Cramer issued the following statement after Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Scott Pruitt proposed approving an application by the State of North Dakota for state primacy over Class VI injection well activities.  Under final approval, the State of North Dakota will serve as the primary regulatory body over geologic storage of carbon dioxide within state boundaries.

"Nearly four years after North Dakota first made the request, the EPA – under new management – is finishing its work on the State’s application to regulate carbon capture within their state boundaries. As a former North Dakota Public Service Commissioner overseeing environmental programs such as the Surface Mine Coal Reclamation Act, I know first-hand how efficiently and responsibly the State of North Dakota exercises these delegated powers. With the State’s expert staff and long history of leading environmental programs, it only makes sense for them to take over as the primary regulator of carbon capture regulations. The announcement today is a victory for our State, and I’m grateful for the Administrator Pruitt’s swift action on this request.”

The State of North Dakota requested to be the primary regulator over Class VI CO2 storage in June 2013. Since then, the application to the EPA has remained open. In an August 2016 letter, Cramer questioned then-EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy on why a decision hadn’t been made regarding North Dakota’s request.

Following today’s proposed approval a 60-day public comment period will begin after which EPA will make a final decision on North Dakota’s application.

Congressman Kevin Cramer is the at-large representative for North Dakota and sits on the House Energy and Commerce Committee, which has primary jurisdiction over the EPA.

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