Congressman Kevin Cramer

Representing North Dakota, At Large
Twitter icon
Facebook icon
YouTube icon
RSS icon

Bipartisan Coal Regulation Reform Approved in House

Mar 6, 2014
Press Release

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Bipartisan legislation to halt devastating new coal regulations has passed the House of Representatives. The Electricity Security and Affordability Act, with Congressman Kevin Cramer as an original cosponsor, will prevent the Obama Administration from going forward with rulemaking to limit carbon emissions from existing coal-fired power plants.

Authored by Republican Congressman Ed Whitfield (Kentucky) and Democratic Senator Joe Manchin (West Virigina), the bill stops impending greenhouse gas regulations until certain conditions are met. The proposed standards for new power plants must be shown achievable for a continuous 12-month period by at least six electric generating units at different plants including a subcategory for at least three lignite units, and separate standards must be created for coal, natural gas, and lignite coal. For existing plants, the bill requires Congressional approval of the regulation and the submission of a report to Congress describing the regulation, its economic impact, and effects on global greenhouse gas emissions before it may go into effect.

“This is a reasonable approach requiring the EPA to set power plant standards which are actually achievable under current technology, and grants Congress, not bureaucrats, the ultimate authority over significant new rules which will affect the lives of every American citizen,” said Cramer. “The bipartisanship proves the protection of affordable and reliable energy sources for the American people is a priority of both parties.”

The legislation is supported by numerous organizations including the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and the United Mine Workers of America. Yesterday, Cramer spoke on the floor of the House of Representatives in favor of the legislation. His remarks are available in video and audio.

Prior to his election to the United States House of Representatives, Cramer served on the North Dakota Public Service Commission. During his tenure, beginning in 2003, Cramer dealt with all aspects of the Commission’s portfolio including regulation of North Dakota’s three investor owned utilities and management of North Dakota’s Surface Mine Coal Reclamation Act State primacy program.

Issues: